Immigrate to Canada as a Nurse in 2023

Nurses are high  Demand in Canada and are on the Canadian NOC List. Qualified Nurses are eligible for Canadian immigration. As a nurse, you may be eligible to immigrate to Canada as a skilled worker through the following economic immigration programs offered by both the federal and provincial governments.

 

Nurses can immigrate to Canada via the following pathways:

 

  • Express Entry
  • Quebec Immigration
  • Provincial Nominee Programs
  • Study in Canada

 

Express Entry for Nurses Immigrating to Canada

 

Nurses qualify for Express Entry under the Federal Skilled Worker Program (FSW) or Canadian Experience Class (CEC) if they meet the program requirements. To apply under the FSW program, candidates must have at least one year of continuous work experience within the past 10 years in a skilled occupation. It is possible for the work experience to have been completed abroad.

 

Candidates who meet the minimum requirements can submit a profile to the Express Entry pool. Once they’re in the pool, they receive a Comprehensive Ranking System (CRS) score out of 1,200. Then, the highest-ranking candidates in the Express Entry pool are issued Invitations to Apply (ITAs) for permanent residence.

 

One of the greatest advantages to the Express Entry system is that if you are invited to apply for permanent residence, your application can be processed as soon as six months.

 

The minimum language score requirement for nurses in Express Entry depends on the individual’s complete profile. You need to score at least a Canadian Language Benchmark (CLB) of 7.0 in English or French in each of the four language competencies to be eligible for Express Entry. In addition, applicants must score at least 67/100 on the six-factor test that assesses candidates’ education level, language skills, and whether they have a job in Canada.

 

Nurse Specializations for Express Entry

 

The National Occupational Classification (NOC) is the national system used in Canada to classify and categorize different types of jobs based on their duties, skills, and education requirements. These are the specialist Nurse Occupations eligible to apply for Express Entry Immigration to Canada:

 

  • Registered Nurses (NOC code 3012): Registered Nurses (RNs) provide direct patient care, assess patients’ health, develop care plans, and administer medications and treatments.

 

  • Licensed Practical Nurses (NOC code 3233): Licensed Practical Nurses (LPNs) provide basic nursing care, such as monitoring patients’ vital signs, administering medications, and helping with daily activities.

 

  • Nurse Practitioners (NOC code 3124): Nurse Practitioners (NPs) provide advanced nursing care, including diagnosing and treating illnesses, prescribing medications, and ordering diagnostic tests.

 

  • Nurse Supervisors and Managers (NOC code 3011): Nurse Supervisors and Managers oversee nursing staff and operations in healthcare settings.

 

  • Other nursing occupations (NOC code 3013): This category includes other nursing occupations, such as clinical nurse specialists, nurse educators, and nurse researchers.

 

  • Psychiatric Nurses (NOC code 3012): Psychiatric Nurses provide specialized care to patients with mental health and psychiatric conditions.

 

  • Community Health Nurses (NOC code 3012): Community Health Nurses work in community settings to promote health and prevent illness, as well as provide care to patients in their homes.

 

  • Occupational Health Nurses (NOC code 3012): Occupational Health Nurses focus on workplace health and safety, conducting assessments, and developing and implementing health programs and policies.

 

  • Public Health Nurses (NOC code 3012): Public Health Nurses work to promote and protect the health of communities, providing education and support around disease prevention, health promotion, and community health issues.

 

  • Perioperative Nurses (NOC code 3012): Perioperative Nurses provide care to patients before, during, and after surgical procedures.

 

  • Geriatric Nurses (NOC code 3012): Geriatric Nurses specialize in the care of elderly patients, providing services such as medication management, chronic disease management, and assistance with daily living activities.

 

  • Neonatal Nurses (NOC code 3012): Neonatal Nurses provide care to newborn infants, including those who are premature, sick, or have other medical conditions.

 

  • Rehabilitation Nurses (NOC code 3012): Rehabilitation Nurses work with patients who have disabilities or chronic illnesses, helping them to improve their quality of life through rehabilitation and ongoing care.

 

  • Critical Care Nurses (NOC code 3012): Critical Care Nurses provide care to patients who are critically ill or injured, often in intensive care units or emergency departments.

 

  • Nurse Researchers (NOC code 3013): Nurse Researchers conduct research to improve the quality of nursing care, develop new treatments, and inform nursing policies and practices.

 

  • Nurse Educators (NOC code 3014): Nurse Educators develop and deliver nursing education programs, including classroom instruction and clinical training.

 

  • Dialysis Nurses (NOC code 3012): Dialysis Nurses provide care to patients who require dialysis treatment, which is used to filter waste products from the blood in patients with kidney disease.

 

  • Wound Care Nurses (NOC code 3012): Wound Care Nurses specialize in the treatment and management of wounds, including acute and chronic wounds, burns, and pressure ulcers.

 

  • Oncology Nurses (NOC code 3012): Oncology Nurses provide care to patients with cancer, including administering chemotherapy and other treatments, managing side effects, and providing emotional support.

 

  • Infectious Disease Nurses (NOC code 3012): Infectious Disease Nurses specialize in the prevention, treatment, and management of infectious diseases, including providing education to patients and the public about disease prevention and control.

 

  • Forensic Nurses (NOC code 3012): Forensic Nurses provide specialized care to patients who have experienced trauma or violence, including performing forensic exams, collecting evidence, and providing emotional support.

 

  • Nurse Consultants (NOC code 3012): Nurse Consultants provide expert advice and guidance to healthcare organizations, policymakers, and other stakeholders on nursing practice, policy, and management.

 

  • Nurse Informaticians (NOC code 3012): Nurse Informaticians use technology and data analysis to improve nursing care and patient outcomes, including managing electronic health records and developing healthcare informatics systems.

 

  • Nurse Coordinators (NOC code 3012): Nurse Coordinators oversee nursing teams and coordinate care for patients in healthcare settings, including managing schedules, staffing, and resources.

 

  • Nurse Anesthetists (NOC code 3122): Nurse Anesthetists provide anesthesia care to patients undergoing surgical or other medical procedures, including administering and monitoring anesthesia and managing patients’ vital signs.

 

  • Nurse Practitioners (NOC code 3124): Nurse Practitioners are advanced practice nurses who diagnose and treat illnesses, prescribe medication, and provide primary and specialized care to patients.

 

  • Nurse Case Managers (NOC code 3012): Nurse Case Managers coordinate patient care and services across multiple healthcare providers, including managing treatment plans and monitoring patient progress.

 

  • Nurse Coaches (NOC code 3012): Nurse Coaches work with patients to promote health and wellness, providing education and support to help patients make positive lifestyle changes and manage chronic conditions.

 

    • Nurse Entrepreneurs (NOC code 0125): Nurse Entrepreneurs start and run their own healthcare-related businesses, including developing and delivering new products or services, and managing staff and finances.




Nurses Need 67 Points to be Eligible for Express Entry and the Federal Skilled Work Program

 

Language Skills (Maximum 28 points)

 

      • CLB/NCLC 9 or higher: 24 points
      • CLB/NCLC 8: 20 points
      • CLB/NCLC 7: 16 points
      • CLB/NCLC 6: 12 points
      • CLB/NCLC 5: 6 points
      • CLB/NCLC 4 or lower: 0 points

 

The language skills factor assesses your ability to communicate in English or French. You can earn up to 24 points for your first official language (either English or French) and up to 4 points for your second official language. Your language proficiency is assessed using the Canadian Language Benchmark (CLB) for English and the Niveaux de compétence linguistique canadiens (NCLC) for French. The points are awarded based on your scores in each of the four language abilities: speaking, listening, reading, and writing.

 

Education (Maximum 25 points)

 

      • Doctoral (Ph.D.) level: 25 points
      • Master’s level or professional degree: 23 points
      • Two or more post-secondary credentials, one of which is a three-year or longer post-secondary credential: 22 points
      • Three-year or longer post-secondary credential: 21 points
      • Two-year post-secondary credential: 19 points
      • One-year post-secondary credential: 15 points
      • Secondary school diploma: 5 points

 

The education level of the applicant is evaluated based on their completed foreign educational credentials. Points are awarded based on the highest level of education completed by the candidate. The maximum points for education are 25.

 

Work Experience (Maximum 15 points)

 

      • 6 or more years: 15 points
      • 4-5 years: 13 points
      • 2-3 years: 11 points
      • 1 year: 9 points
      • Less than 1 year: 0 points

 

The work experience of the applicant is evaluated based on their past work experience. Points are awarded based on the number of years of full-time work experience in the past ten years in a skilled occupation. The maximum points for work experience are 15.

 

Age (Maximum 12 points)

 

      • 18 to 35 years: 12 points
      • 36 years: 11 points
      • 37 years: 10 points
      • 38 years: 9 points
      • 39 years: 8 points
      • 40 years: 7 points
      • 41 years: 6 points
      • 42 years: 5 points
      • 43 years: 4 points
      • 44 years: 3 points
      • 45 years: 2 points
      • 46 years: 1 point
      • 47 years or older: 0 points

 

Arranged Employment (Maximum 10 points)

 

      • Job offer approved by Employment and Social Development Canada (ESDC) or Labour Market Impact Assessment (LMIA) exempt: 10 points
      • Job offer in a National Occupational Classification (NOC) skill level 0, A or B, that is not LMIA-exempt: 10 points
      • Job offer in a NOC skill level C: 5 points
      • Job offer in a NOC skill level D: 0 points

 

Adaptability (Maximum 10 points)

 

      • Spouse or common-law partner’s language level: 5 points
      • Previous work or study in Canada: 10 points
      • Relative in Canada: 5 points
      • Arranged employment: 5 points
      • Provincial nomination: 5 points

 

To be eligible for the Federal Skilled Worker Program and Immigrate to Canada as a Nurse, applicants must score at least 67 points out of a possible 100 points.

 

Nurses Require an Educational Credential Assessment Before they Apply to Immigrate to Canada as a Nurse via Express Entry

 

To obtain an Educational Credential Assessment (ECA) for your nursing degree in Canada, you must follow these steps:

 

Choose a designated organization: The first step is to choose a designated organization that is approved by Immigration, Refugees and Citizenship Canada (IRCC) to provide ECA reports. The most commonly used organizations for nurses are the World Education Services (WES) and the International Credential Assessment Service of Canada (ICAS). ECAs for Nurses can be conducted by any of the following ECA providers:

 

Comparative Education Service (CES) – University of Toronto School of Continuing Studies:
Website: https://learn.utoronto.ca/international-professionals/comparative-education-service
Email: [email protected]
Phone: 416-978-2400

International Credential Assessment Service of Canada (ICAS):
Website: https://www.icascanada.ca/
Email: [email protected]
Phone: 1-800-321-6021

World Education Services (WES) Canada:
Website: https://www.wes.org/ca/
Email: [email protected]
Phone: 416-972-0070

International Qualifications Assessment Service (IQAS):
Website: https://www.alberta.ca/iqas.aspx
Email: [email protected]
Phone: 780-427-2655

International Credential Evaluation Service (ICES):
Website: https://www.bcit.ca/ices/
Email: [email protected]
Phone: 604-434-1610

Medical Council of Canada (MCC):
Website: https://mcc.ca/
Email: [email protected]
Phone: 613-521-6012

 

You will need to submit your academic documents, such as your transcripts and degree certificate to the designated organization you have chosen. You will also need to pay the required fees which are:

 

Comparative Education Service (CES) – University of Toronto School of Continuing Studies:
Basic Report: $220 CAD
General Assessment Report: $275 CAD
Comprehensive Report: $550 CAD

International Credential Assessment Service of Canada (ICAS):
Basic ECA: $195 CAD
General Assessment ECA: $295 CAD
Comprehensive ECA: $495 CAD

World Education Services (WES) Canada:
Basic: $220 CAD
Document-by-Document: $270 CAD
Course-by-Course: $305 CAD
ICAP: $330 CAD

International Qualifications Assessment Service (IQAS):
Basic Assessment: $200 CAD
Comprehensive Assessment: $400 CAD

International Credential Evaluation Service (ICES):
Document-by-Document Assessment: $200 CAD
Comprehensive Assessment: $400 CAD

Medical Council of Canada (MCC):
ECA for the purpose of medical licensure: $425 CAD

 

The designated organization will review your documents and provide an ECA report, which will indicate the Canadian equivalency of your nursing degree. You can use the ECA report as part of your application for immigration or permanent residency in Canada. You may also need it if you plan to pursue further education or apply for a nursing license in Canada.

 

Apply for Licensing as a Nurse Immigrating to Canada

 

After obtaining an Educational Credential Assessment (ECA) for Immigration you are also required to obtain a further ECA from the National Nursing Assessment Service (NNAS). The NNAS is an organization that is involved in the process of assessing the educational and professional credentials of internationally-educated nurses who want to work in Canada. NNAS does not issue nursing licenses or register nurses to work in Canada. Instead, it provides a streamlined process for assessing the educational credentials of internationally-educated nurses and forwarding those assessments to the regulatory bodies or colleges of nurses in Canada.

 

Here’s how the NNAS fits into the process of becoming licensed as a nurse in Canada

 

As an internationally-educated nurse, you will need to obtain an ECA report from a designated organization approved by Immigration, Refugees and Citizenship Canada (IRCC). This report will evaluate your nursing education and determine its Canadian equivalency. NNAS is one of the designated organizations that can provide an ECA report.

 

If you choose to use NNAS for your ECA report, you will need to apply for an assessment with NNAS. NNAS will verify your identity, review your nursing education and work experience, and determine if your credentials meet the Canadian standards for nursing practice. This process can take several weeks to several months, depending on the complexity of your case and the volume of applications being processed.

 

Once the assessment is complete, NNAS will send you an ECA report that summarizes the assessment findings and provides an evaluation of your nursing education. This report will be sent directly to the regulatory body or college of nurses in the province or territory where you plan to work.

 

Once you receive your ECA report, you can apply for licensure with the regulatory body or college of nurses in the province or territory where you plan to work. The application process will vary depending on the regulatory body or college of nurses, but will typically involve submitting your ECA report, proof of nursing education and work experience, language proficiency test results, and a criminal record check.

 

The NNAS plays a key role in the process of assessing the educational credentials of internationally-educated nurses who want to work in Canada. While the NNAS is not involved in issuing nursing licenses or registering nurses to work in Canada, it provides an important service by streamlining the process of obtaining an ECA report and forwarding that report to the regulatory bodies or colleges of nurses in Canada.

 

Apply for Licensure as a Foreign Nurse Immigrating to Canada

 

After the NNAS assessment you will need to apply to the regulatory body or college of nurses in the province or territory where you plan to work. Each province and territory has its own regulatory body or college of nurses that is responsible for setting standards for nursing practice and issuing nursing licenses. The Nursing Regulatory bodies in Canada are:

 

Alberta: College and Association of Registered Nurses of Alberta (CARNA)
Website: https://www.nurses.ab.ca/
Phone: 780-451-0043
Email: [email protected]

British Columbia: College of Registered Nurses of British Columbia (CRNBC)
Website: https://www.crnbc.ca/
Phone: 604-736-7331
Email: [email protected]

Manitoba: College of Registered Nurses of Manitoba (CRNM)
Website: https://www.crnm.mb.ca/
Phone: 204-774-3477
Email: [email protected]

New Brunswick: Nurses Association of New Brunswick (NANB)
Website: https://www.nanb.nb.ca/
Phone: 506-458-8731
Email: [email protected]

Newfoundland and Labrador: Association of Registered Nurses of Newfoundland and Labrador (ARNNL)
Website: https://www.arnnl.ca/
Phone: 709-753-6040
Email: [email protected]

Northwest Territories: Registered Nurses Association of Northwest Territories and Nunavut (RNANT/NU)
Website: https://www.rnantnu.ca/
Phone: 867-873-2745
Email: [email protected]

Nova Scotia: College of Registered Nurses of Nova Scotia (CRNNS)
Website: https://crnns.ca/
Phone: 902-491-9744
Email: [email protected]

Nunavut: Registered Nurses Association of Northwest Territories and Nunavut (RNANT/NU)
Website: https://www.rnantnu.ca/
Phone: 867-873-2745
Email: [email protected]

Ontario: College of Nurses of Ontario (CNO)
Website: https://www.cno.org/
Phone: 416-928-0900
Email: [email protected]

Prince Edward Island: Association of Registered Nurses of Prince Edward Island (ARNPEI)
Website: https://www.arnpei.ca/
Phone: 902-368-3764
Email: [email protected]

Quebec: Ordre des infirmières et infirmiers du Québec (OIIQ)
Website: https://www.oiiq.org/
Phone: 514-935-2501
Email: [email protected]

Saskatchewan: Saskatchewan Registered Nurses Association (SRNA)
Website: https://www.srna.org/
Phone: 306-359-4200
Email: [email protected]

Yukon: Yukon Registered Nurses Association (YRNA)
Website: https://yrna.ca/
Phone: 867-667-4062
Email: [email protected]

 

The application process for nursing licensure includes submitting documentation such as your ECA report, proof of nursing education and work experience, language proficiency test results, and a criminal record check. You may also need to provide reference letters from previous employers or colleagues.

 

In addition to meeting the basic eligibility requirements, you will also need to meet the specific requirements of the regulatory body or college of nurses in your province or territory. These requirements may include completing an application form, paying an application fee, and submitting any additional documents or information that may be required.

 

Once your application has been reviewed and approved, you will be eligible to take the nursing exam and obtain your nursing license. The nursing exam may include a written component, a practical component, or both, and is designed to test your knowledge and skills in nursing practice.

 

Complete Additional Requirements

 

In addition to meeting the basic eligibility requirements and completing the application process, you may also need to complete additional requirements to become licensed as a nurse in Canada. These requirements may include completing a nursing bridging program, a nursing jurisprudence exam, and/or a nursing exam.

 

Nursing Bridging Programs

 

Nursing bridging programs are designed for internationally-educated nurses who need to update their nursing knowledge and skills to meet Canadian nursing standards. These programs may include courses in nursing theory, nursing practice, and nursing ethics, as well as clinical placements in Canadian healthcare settings.

 

The length and cost of nursing bridging programs can vary depending on the program and the province or territory where you plan to work. Some nursing bridging programs are available online, while others are offered in-person.

 

Nursing Jurisprudence Exam

 

The nursing jurisprudence exam is a test of your knowledge of nursing laws, regulations, and ethical standards in Canada. The exam is designed to ensure that nurses have a basic understanding of the legal and ethical requirements of nursing practice in Canada. The nursing jurisprudence exam may be a requirement for nursing licensure in some provinces and territories. The exam is typically offered online and can be completed at your own pace.

 

Nursing Exam

 

Some provinces and territories may require you to complete a nursing exam in addition to the nursing jurisprudence exam. The nursing exam is designed to test your knowledge and skills in nursing practice and may include a written component, a practical component or both. The nursing exam may be offered by the regulatory body or college of nurses in your province or territory or by an independent testing organization.

 

Submit an Express Entry Application to Immigrate to Canada as a Nurse

 

By now you will have your Educational Credential Assessment. You will have taken your Language Test and you will have applied to the NNAS and started the process of getting licensed as a Nurse in Canada.

 

You now need to create your Express Entry profile to Immigrate to Canada as a Nurse.  This profile is the basis for the entire application process, so it is important to provide accurate information and to ensure that all documents are uploaded correctly.

 

Here are the steps to creating an Express Entry profile as a Nurse

 

      • Visit the Canadian government’s immigration website
      • Complete the eligibility questionnaire
      • Provide personal information
      • Create a job seeker validation code
      • Enter your work experience
      • Enter your education details
      • Enter your language test result
      • Calculate your CRS score
      • Submit your profile

 

It is important to note that creating an Express Entry profile does not guarantee that you will be invited to apply for permanent residency. However, having a high CRS score can increase your chances of being invited to apply. In addition, it is important to keep your Express Entry profile up to date. If there are any changes to your personal information, work experience, or education, you should update your profile as soon as possible. This will ensure that your information is accurate and up-to-date, which can improve your chances of being selected for permanent residency.

 

CRS Scores for Nurses Immigrating to Canada

 

The minimum Comprehensive Ranking System (CRS) score required to receive an Invitation to Apply (ITA) for permanent residency through the Express Entry system varies depending on the specific draw, which is conducted every two weeks. The CRS score requirement is determined by the Canadian government based on the number of available spots and the number of candidates in the pool at that time.

 

As of 2023, the CRS score requirements for nurses receiving an ITA have been relatively low, as nursing is considered a highly in-demand occupation in Canada. In fact, nursing is one of the occupations that has been specifically targeted by the Canadian government through the Federal Skilled Worker Program.

 

According to recent data from the Canadian government, the average CRS score for nurses receiving an ITA in 2023 was around 445-450. To maximize your chances of receiving an ITA as a nurse, it is important to ensure that you have a strong CRS score. This can be achieved by improving your language skills, obtaining additional education or certifications, and gaining more work experience in your field.

 

FAQs to Immigrate to Canada as a Nurse

 

Q: Can I immigrate to Canada as an Intensive Care Nurse?

A: Yes, Nurses with an Intensive care specialization are in high demand commanding salaries well above average right across Canada. As an intensive care nurse, you will have experience in an Intensive care unit (ICU) providing care for patients with life-threatening medical conditions. These nurses work in the critical care unit of a hospital or healthcare facility and look after patients who have experienced invasive surgery, accidents, trauma or organ failure. Those immigrating to Canada as an Intensive Care Nurse can expect a salary of around $75,000 to $106,000 per year

 

Q: Can I immigrate to Canada as a Nursing Consultant?

A: Nursing consultants immigrating to Canada bring with them a specialist skill set not often found outside of the major metropolis areas of Toronto and Vancouver and, as such, are highly sought after. Canada will be seeking skills such as acting as a liaison between physicians, clients, and attorneys. Nursing Consultants in Canada perform assessments on nursing and hospital facilities and provide expert testimony concerning the activities and duties associated with nursing and healthcare. Some are self-employed, while others work for consulting firms, hospital risk management departments, HMOs, and law firms. After you successfully immigrate to Canada as a Nursing Consultant you should expect to earn between $78,000 and $109,000 per year.

 

Q: Can I immigrate to Canada as a Mental Health Nurse registered psychiatric nurse (R.P.N.)?

A: Yes, of particular interest to Canadian Immigration at both a Federal and Provincial (State / Territory) Level are those looking to immigrate to Canada as a Mental Health or Psychiatric Nurse. Psychiatric unit nurses care for patients with illness or disease that has led them to temporary or long-term hospitalization. They are responsible for direct care of a set of patients, facilitating their recovery through social interaction and traditional therapies. Psychiatric unit nurses are required to complete state nursing licensure requirements, and due to the complexity of this specialization, many employers prefer that these nurses hold a Bachelor of Science in Nursing (BSN). The average Mental Health Nurse salary in Canada is $72,717 per year or $37 per hour. This is around 2.2 times more than the national average with more experienced Mental Health Nurses commanding up to workers make up to $112,000.

 

Q: Can I Immigrate to Canada as a Occupational Health Nurse?

A: Yes, in Canada work to prevent, investigate, and treat workplace related illnesses and injuries. We see current demand in terms of Express Entry demand for those looking to immigrate to Canada as an occupational health nurse to be consistently strong right across the county with emphasis on the west coast. The average Occupational Health Nurse salary in Canada is $67,481 per year or $35 per hour. This is around 2.1 times more than the Canadian average salary. Entry level positions start at $46,000 while most experienced Occupational Health Nurses in Canada earn over $102,000.

 

Q: Can I Immigrate to Canada as a Nurse Researcher?

A: Yes, a Nurse Researcher in Canada is a scientist who conducts research that improves the field of nursing overall. Although this specialty can be very detailed and specialized, it can also be one of the most rewarding, since these nurses make discoveries that directly impact the lives of patients and medical staff. Those looking to immigrate to Canada as a nurse researcher are in a very strong position, we’ve seen very strong historic demand from the express entry pool for those with the right number of CRS points. Additionally, salaries in Canada for Nurse researchers are among the best in the World, even outside of the major cities.

 

Q: Can I Immigrate to Canada as a Clinical Nurse?

A: Yes, candidates looking at Immigrating to Canada as a clinical nurse are in a very strong position over the next few years with demand predicated to remain strong. Clinical Nurse Specialists in Canada provide direct care to patients in one of a range of specialties, such as pediatrics, geriatrics, emergency care and oncology. Clinical Nurses in Canada command earnings well above average in terms of nursing and career progression is rapid. The average Clinical Nurse salary in Canada is $81,335 per year with those at the top end of the scale earning over $138,000.

 

Q: Can I Immigrate to Canada as an A&E Nurse?

A: Yes, immigrating to Canada as an A&E Nurse you’ll be expected to have several years direct experience on an Accident and Emergency ward in your home country in an equivalent role. In Canada emergency nurses provide rapid assessment and treatment to patients in the initial phase of illness or trauma and often in life-threatening situations in emergency rooms and trauma centers. Toronto and Vancouver have some of the Worlds leading Trauma Centers and whilst these jobs can be competitive they are always looking for highly skilled candidates from other countries who can broaden their overall scope and depth of knowledge.

 

Q: Can I Immigrate to Canada as a Community Nurse?

A: Yes, immigrating to Canada as a Community Nurse (also known as Immigrating to Canada as a Public Health Nurse) requires a very specific skills set at Masters or Post Graduate Second-Degree level. Opportunities are varied and challenging especially outside the main urban areas although deeply rewarding. The average Community Nurse salary in Canada is $75,093 per year or $39 per hour. Entry positions start at $53k rising to $110k.

 

Q: Can I Immigrate to Canada as a Registered Nurse?

A: If you’re seriously considering immigrating to Canada as a Registered Nurse, then you’re in the right place. Medical Migration to Canada is one of our areas of expertise and we specialize in helping qualified Nurses immigrate to Canada. Those in the general Registered Nurse category tend to be among the strongest in term of moving swiftly through the process of Express Entry through to receiving an Invitation to apply for Permanent Residency via the Federal Skilled Worker Program either through having enough points overall, securing a job offer or Provincial Nomination. The average Registered Nurse salary in Canada is $68,542 per year or $35 per hour. This is around 2.0x the average Canadian salary. Entry positions start at $49, 500 and more experienced workers make up to $99,000.

 

 

Q: Can I Immigrate to Canada as a Critical Care Nurse?

A: Yes, the average Critical Care Nurse salary in Canada is $77,756 per year or $41 per hour. This is around 2.4 times more than the average wage of the country. Entry level positions start at $54,000 while most experienced workers make up to $109,000. If you’re looking to Immigrate to Canada as a Critical care nurse your skills are very much in demand in Canada. It’s a highly specialized and technical role although Canada is always looking to broaden the depth of its knowledge base and strengthen its position as one of the top medical care providing countries in the World.

 

Q: Can I Immigrate to Canada as a Nurse practitioner?

A: Yes, and the average Nurse Practitioner salary in Canada is $92,679 per year or $48 per hour. This is around 2.8 times the national average salary. Entry positions start at $68,000 rising to more than $140,000.

 

Q: What are the requirements for immigrating to Canada as a nurse?

A: To immigrate to Canada as a nurse, you must meet the eligibility requirements for one of the various immigration programs offered by the Canadian government. This typically involves having a certain level of education, language proficiency, and work experience in the nursing field. In addition, you will need to pass a medical exam and provide police certificates as part of your application.

 

Q: What are the different immigration programs available for nurses in Canada?

A: There are several immigration programs available for nurses in Canada, including the Federal Skilled Worker Program, the Federal Skilled Trades Program, the Canadian Experience Class, and various Provincial Nominee Programs. Each program has its own eligibility requirements, so it is important to research the different options and determine which one is best for you.

 

Q: What is the Express Entry system?

A: The Express Entry system is an online application management system used by the Canadian government to process applications for permanent residency. It allows eligible candidates to create a profile and enter a pool of potential applicants. The government then conducts regular draws and invites candidates with the highest Comprehensive Ranking System (CRS) scores to apply for permanent residency.

 

Q: How can I increase my chances of being selected for permanent residency as a nurse?

A: There are several ways to increase your chances of being selected for permanent residency as a nurse, including improving your language skills, obtaining additional education or certifications, and gaining more work experience in your field. It is also important to ensure that you have a strong Comprehensive Ranking System (CRS) score, as this is one of the main factors considered by the Canadian government when selecting candidates for permanent residency.

 

Q: Do I need a job offer to immigrate to Canada as a nurse?

A: A job offer is not always required to immigrate to Canada as a nurse, but it can be beneficial in some cases. Having a job offer can increase your chances of being selected for permanent residency and can also make it easier to obtain a work permit once you arrive in Canada. Some immigration programs, such as the Provincial Nominee Program, require a job offer as part of the eligibility requirements.

 

Q: How long does the application process take to immigrate to Canada as a nurse?

A: The application process to immigrate to Canada as a nurse can vary depending on the specific immigration program and the complexity of your application. In general, the process can take anywhere from several months to over a year. It is important to be patient and to ensure that all of your documentation is complete and accurate to avoid any delays.

 

Q: Can I bring my family with me when I immigrate to Canada as a nurse?

A: Yes, you can bring your family with you when you immigrate to Canada as a nurse. Spouses and dependent children can apply for dependent visas and can accompany you to Canada. It is important to ensure that you include all family members in your application and that they meet the eligibility requirements for immigration to Canada.

 

Q: Do I need to take a language test to immigrate to Canada as a nurse?

A: Yes, you will need to take a language test as part of your application for immigration to Canada as a nurse. The language test is used to assess your proficiency in either English or French, which are the two official languages of Canada. The specific language test required will depend on the immigration program you are applying for.

 

Q: How much money do I need to immigrate to Canada as a nurse?

A: The amount of money you need to immigrate to Canada as a nurse will depend on a number of factors, such as the immigration program you are applying for and whether or not you have a job offer. In general, you will need to demonstrate that you have enough funds to support yourself and your family for the first few months after arriving in Canada. This typically includes funds for housing, food, and other basic living expenses.

 

Q: Will I need to undergo a medical examination to immigrate to Canada as a nurse?

A: Yes, you will need to undergo a medical examination as part of your application for immigration to Canada as a nurse. The medical exam is used to ensure that you do not have any medical conditions that could be a danger to public health in Canada. The specific requirements for the medical exam will depend on the immigration program you are applying for.

 

Q: Can I work in any province or territory in Canada as a nurse?

A: Yes, once you have obtained permanent residency in Canada, you can work in any province or territory as a nurse. However, it is important to note that each province and territory has its own licensing requirements for nurses, so you may need to undergo additional training or certification to be eligible to work in certain regions.

 

Q: Will my nursing education and work experience be recognized in Canada?

A: Canada has a system in place to recognize foreign credentials for certain occupations, including nursing. However, the specific requirements and process for credential recognition can vary depending on the province or territory in which you plan to work. It is important to research the requirements for your specific region and to ensure that your education and work experience meet the necessary criteria.

 

Q: Can I apply for Canadian citizenship as a nurse?

A: Yes, once you have lived in Canada as a permanent resident for a certain period of time, you may be eligible to apply for Canadian citizenship. The specific requirements for Canadian citizenship can vary, but typically involve demonstrating that you have lived in Canada for a certain number of years, are proficient in English or French, and have knowledge of Canadian history and culture.

 

Q: Can I apply for immigration to Canada as a nurse if I do not have a nursing degree?

A: It may be possible to apply for immigration to Canada as a nurse even if you do not have a nursing degree. Some immigration programs may accept applicants with other healthcare qualifications or work experience in a related field. However, it is important to note that having a nursing degree or certification can significantly increase your chances of being selected for permanent residency in Canada.

 

Q: Can I apply for immigration to Canada as a nurse if I am over the age of 50?

A: It may be possible to apply for immigration to Canada as a nurse if you are over the age of 50, but it can be more difficult to meet the eligibility requirements for some immigration programs. In general, the age factor is less of a consideration for immigration to Canada than other factors such as language proficiency and work experience. However, it is important to research the specific eligibility requirements for your chosen immigration program and to consult with an immigration lawyer if necessary.

 

Q: Can I bring my family with me when I immigrate to Canada as a nurse?

A: Yes, you may be able to bring your family with you when you immigrate to Canada as a nurse. This includes your spouse or common-law partner, as well as any dependent children. However, you will need to ensure that you meet the specific requirements for family sponsorship, which can vary depending on the immigration program you are applying for.

 

Q: How long does the immigration process typically take for nurses?

A: The length of the immigration process can vary depending on a number of factors, including the specific immigration program you are applying for, the demand for nurses in Canada, and the number of applications being processed by the Canadian government at any given time. In general, the immigration process can take several months to a year or more.

 

Q: Can I work in Canada as a nurse while I am waiting for my permanent residency application to be processed?

A: It may be possible to work in Canada as a nurse while you are waiting for your permanent residency application to be processed, depending on the specific circumstances of your case. If you are applying for permanent residency through the Express Entry program, for example, you may be able to obtain a work permit that will allow you to work in Canada while your application is being processed.

 

Q: What are the language requirements for immigrating to Canada as a nurse?

A: Language proficiency is an important factor for immigrating to Canada as a nurse, as you will need to be able to communicate effectively with patients and colleagues. Depending on the specific immigration program you are applying for, you may be required to provide proof of your proficiency in either English or French. The language proficiency requirements can vary, but typically involve taking a standardized language test such as the IELTS or CELPIP.

 

Q: Can I apply for immigration to Canada as a nurse if I have a criminal record?

A: Having a criminal record can make it more difficult to obtain permanent residency in Canada as a nurse, as the Canadian government may consider you to be a risk to public safety. However, the specific impact of a criminal record on your immigration application can depend on a number of factors, including the type of offense and how long ago it occurred.

 

Q: Can I apply for immigration to Canada as a nurse if I have a medical condition?

A: Having a medical condition does not necessarily disqualify you from immigrating to Canada as a nurse, but you will need to undergo a medical examination as part of your application to ensure that you do not pose a risk to public health in Canada. If you have a medical condition that requires ongoing treatment, you may need to demonstrate that you have access to appropriate medical care in Canada.

 

Q: What are the employment prospects for nurses in Canada in 2023?

A: The employment prospects for nurses in Canada in 2023 are generally positive, as the demand for healthcare services continues to grow in Canada due to an aging population and ongoing health challenges. According to recent job market data, registered nurses and nurse practitioners are among the most in-demand healthcare professionals in Canada.

 

Q: What are the salary expectations for nurses in Canada in 2023?

A: The salary expectations for nurses in Canada in 2023 can vary depending on a number of factors, including your level of education, experience, and the region of Canada where you are working. According to recent data from the Canadian government, the median hourly wage for registered nurses in Canada was approximately $39.00 in 2020. However, it is important to note that this is a median value and actual salaries can vary widely depending on the specific employer and job market conditions.

 

Q: What are the educational requirements for immigrating to Canada as a nurse?

A: The educational requirements for immigrating to Canada as a nurse can vary depending on the specific immigration program you are applying for, as well as the province or territory where you plan to work. In general, however, you will need to have completed a nursing program that meets Canadian standards, and you may need to have your credentials evaluated by a recognized credential assessment agency. Additionally, some immigration programs may require you to hold a specific level of education, such as a bachelor’s degree in nursing.

 

Q: What are the cultural differences I should be aware of when working as a nurse in Canada?

A: Canada is a culturally diverse country, and there may be some cultural differences you should be aware of when working as a nurse in Canada. For example, the approach to healthcare in Canada may differ from what you are used to in your home country, and you may need to adapt to working with patients from different cultural backgrounds. It is also important to be aware of the legal and ethical standards for nursing in Canada, which may differ from those in your home country.

 

Q: What are the housing options for nurses in Canada?

A: Housing options for nurses in Canada can vary depending on the region where you plan to work, as well as your personal preferences and budget. Some nurses may choose to rent an apartment or house, while others may choose to purchase a home. Depending on your employer and the region of Canada where you work, you may be eligible for certain housing benefits or subsidies.

 

Q: What support is available for nurses who are immigrating to Canada?

A: There are a number of resources and support services available to nurses who are immigrating to Canada, including government programs, professional organizations, and settlement agencies. These resources can help you navigate the immigration process, find employment opportunities, and adapt to life in Canada. Additionally, many healthcare employers in Canada offer orientation and training programs for new employees, which can be a valuable source of support and information.

 

Q: When I Immigrate to Canada as a Nurse on Permanent Residency what does it mean?

A: Nurses who have immigrated to Canada get the following rights and privileges:

 

      • Canadian Permanent Residents can:
      • Live and work in Canada
      • Enter and leave without restriction
      • Study in Canada
      • Access Canadian Healthcare
      • Access social benefits
      • Apply for Citizenship and Dual Nationality after four years
      • Enjoy protection under Canadian law and the Canadian Charter of Rights and Freedoms
      • Canadian Permanent Residency for those immigrating to Canada as a Nurse converts into Citizenship and Canadian Nationality after four years.

 

Here are some resources and organizations that can help nurses immigrating to Canada

 

Canadian Nurses Association (CNA)
Website: https://cna-aiic.ca/
Contact: [email protected]

National Nursing Assessment Service (NNAS)
Website: https://nnas.ca/
Contact: [email protected]

Immigration, Refugees and Citizenship Canada (IRCC)
Website: https://www.canada.ca/en/immigration-refugees-citizenship.html
Contact: https://www.canada.ca/en/immigration-refugees-citizenship/corporate/contact-ircc.html

Settlement agencies
Website: Varies by organization, but a list of settlement agencies can be found on the IRCC website: https://www.canada.ca/en/immigration-refugees-citizenship/services/new-immigrants/new-life-canada/help-settle/settlement-services.html

International Qualifications Assessment Service (IQAS)
Website: https://www.alberta.ca/iqas.aspx
Contact: 780-427-2655

World Education Services (WES)
Website: https://www.wes.org/ca/
Contact: https://www.wes.org/ca/contact-us/

Nursing Career Centre
Website: https://nursingcareerscanada.ca/
Contact: https://nursingcareerscanada.ca/contact-us/

HealthForceOntario
Website: https://www.healthforceontario.ca/
Contact: https://www.healthforceontario.ca/en/Home/Contact-Us

Nursing Education Program Approval Board (NEPAB)
Website: https://www.nepab.ca/
Contact: [email protected]

Canadian Society of Immigration Consultants (CSIC)
Website: https://csic-scci.ca/
Contact: [email protected]

Editor in Chief - EmigrateCanada.com at EmigrateCanada.com | Website | + posts

Editor in Chief - EmigrateCanada.com

Dr. Montague John (PhD), is one of the World’s leading Canadian Immigration experts. Affectionately known as “Monty” he established EmigrateCanada.com more than 25 years ago and it has grown to be one of the most reliable sources of Canada Immigration information.

In 2022 Dr. Montague John (PhD) published his book, “How to Immigrate to Canada” as EmigrateCanada.com, which featured as Bestseller in its Category for several weeks. Montague co-ordinates all the qualified contributors at EmigrateCanada.com and serves as Editor-in-Chief.